Making time for workouts

I'm not easily irritated. Blowing your horn at me .2 seconds after the light changed or pulling my hair (and good luck with that) might get under my skin a bit, but for the most part, I'm pretty easy going.

But if there's one expression that gets my panties in a wad, (and they are very hard to unwad right now with only one arm), it's this:

 Lifestyle changes are complex. Having a coach basically yell at you when you say you don't have time isn't useful advice. It sounds kinda mean. And no one needs mean. 

Lifestyle changes are complex. Having a coach basically yell at you when you say you don't have time isn't useful advice. It sounds kinda mean. And no one needs mean. 

Client: I just can't find the time to work out.

Coach: You have time, you're just not making it a priority.

My frustration with the above situation, just to be clear, is with the coach and not the client. I can't think of a more judgemental and condescending way to speak with a potential client than to say you're wrong, I'm right, and if you cared more about your health and well-being, you'd find the time. That's not a compassionate and empathetic response. And it sure as hell doesn't do the client any favors. 

Listen I'm not saying to not be truthful. Sometimes you have to take a hard line with folks. Sometimes you need to go all Tom Cruise on Jack Nicholson in "A Few Good Men" and battle over the truth. 

But is that really the first response to have?

Sorry, but no. 

I would argue that my job is to help a client figure out what barrier is keeping him or her from making the time to work out. Sure time is a factor, but if you don't ask some empathetic, compassionate questions you'll never get to the why piece of the equation. Complex lifestyle changes are not black and white. This is a gray area and "you just haven't made it a priority" is a black and white answer. 

My role as a coach or potential coach is to guide you. Not shame you. Not convince you. And not tell you what you already know.

I've heard the analogy that a coach is more like a guide dog. You, the client, already know where you want to go. I'm not going to drag you to the arcade if you set out to see a movie. I'm going to help you get to the movie.

And hopefully, help get you where you want to go.

With that in mind, if you are looking for a way to sneak in a few workouts at home, my co-worker and friend Josh Williams just released a new product designed to help you get in a fantastic at home workout. This program lets you build a variety of different workouts with minimal equipment. 

And as a bonus, Josh is a big ol' Steelers' fan, so there's that. 

Check out his new product here: